Then & Now Exhibition

Then & Now Exhibition at Telluride Gallery of Fine Art
Image by Sheila Pree Bright, The People's Uprising organization, Justice for Breonna Taylor, protesting the decision by the Kentucky grand jury to indict former officers in connection to the shooting death of Breonna Taylor, Atlanta, GA, 2020, Archival Inkjet Print, Edition 3/7, 14 x 21 in, 20½ x 27¼ in. (framed)

View Then & Now Exhibition

PRESS RELEASE

The Telluride Gallery of Fine Art is pleased to present Then & Now, a group exhibition featuring artists Sheila Pree Bright, Dan Budnik, Alison Saar, and Lezley Saar. Please join us at the gallery for an opening reception on Friday, August 13, from 5:00pm - 8:00pm and for a local Art Walk evening on Thursday, September 2, from 5:00pm - 8:00pm. 


Dan Budnik was an American documentary photographer who was best known for his intimate portraits of well known artists as well as his focus on Native American culture and the Civil Rights Movement. His iconic shots of Martin Luther King, Jr. from 1963 are included in this presentation. “Budnik’s photography wasn’t just about capturing a moment in time; he sought to capture the essence of the individuals within the frame” (Ashley Hayward, Owner, Telluride Gallery of Fine Art).  Sheila Pree Bright has a similar goal and strives to give visibility to often unseen communities. On view in this exhibition are six photographs from her documentation of the 2020 response to police shootings in Atlanta, Ferguson, Baltimore, Washington D.C., and Baton Rouge. These important images demonstrate how little has changed between “Then” and “Now,” especially when considered alongside Budnik’s historic images. Alison Saar’s woodblock prints recall the tragedy of slavery in our nation, but her figures illustrate strength and resistance. In this way, she powerfully contributes to the narrative of the African American experience as one informed by history and heritage. The “Gender Renaissance” works of Lezley Saar use fictional characters from Victorian and Edwardian eras as a surrealist response to her own personal experience with biracial and transgender identities. This contemporary spin on figures from centuries past ties “Then” with “Now” in a way that reminds us of the generational struggles with these complex topics. By spotlighting this selection, the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art hopes to encourage remembrance of “Then,” reflection on “Now,” and change for the future.